Dimensional Illustration: Mote Warrior

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Dimensional Illustration; Mote Warrior

Dimensional illustration was a niche specialty that saw most of its popularity in the ’80s and ’90s. The term referred to sculptural work that was photographed and used as illustration in lieu of flat work and it did well enough to warrant its own annual awards presentation (I won a Bronze Medal in 1993 for an interior I did for Amazing Stories).

I did several dimensional pieces for my friend Charlie Ryan at Aboriginal Science Fiction but the overwhelming influence of computer-generated imagery smothered the use of “real” dimensional work.

This is how I imagined the Mote Warriors from the SF classic The Mote in God’s Eye; the environment measures 16″ X 24″ X 8″ and is built of wood, Bondo, plastic, paper and paint. The figure is made of Super Scuply and Pro-Mat.

Photography by Roy Buckener of Kennesaw Creative.

From the collection of Jeff Barnes.

Sketchbook Drawings

After my fire-and-brimstone sketchbook post the other day I thought I would post most sketchbook drawings here on the blog. I don’t have dates for all of these–I know that they are all Clarksville work though.

Fae Trooper: Uniform design for a shared universe my son Conrad and I have worked on.

Fae Trooper

Brule: Another one for Conrad; I think he was going through a King Kull phase

Brule

Batgirl: While I applaud DC’s daring for their recent 52 relaunch, I was less than thrilled with the way storylines in so many books were just chopped off with the literary equivalent to a rusty machete.

2012-11-02 BatGirl

Slinky Girls: Lori and I have a deal. I can draw what I want in my sketchbook, but she gets to edit it….which means it stays PG-13. I am fine with that – leaving things to your imagination .

2011-05-03 Sketchbook MAY

I also want to point out  that while it is true some of these outfits look like they were made in a belt factory, none of these women are weak in any way. All the drawings were done on 5 1/2″ X 8″ sheets of paper using pencil, gel pen, design markers and a bit of paint. (The trooper was a little larger). The two slinky girls were done on a toned paper with white paper affixed at the appropriate points with spray adhesive. None of the drawings took me longer than an hour to complete.