DR Venus : Color version

venus

Again –  a color version of a drawing that I’ve shown here in the past as a  black & white image:   My version of Venus from FIREBALL XL5 with some “tweaking” in both appearance and ability.

 (It occurs to me that in our current socio-political environment someone could assume some sort  of sordid intent with my use of the word “tweak” but please be reassured there is no ulterior motive.)

There’s a bit of challenge in maintaining uniformity in the XL5 crew (especially after you’ve seen color photos) so I kept the good doctor’s green jumpsuit but gave her a pointy-shouldered jacket to match Steve Zodiac’s uniform.

stevevenusjetbike

It also seemed a perfect situation for my beloved Trap-Jaw palette comprised of the tropical magentas/oranges and turquoises of that particular He-Man adversary. However,  I was putting this together it occurred to me that those colors just a matter of horking from Filmation’ s color choice – some of those colors can be found in  vivid sunsets of both dawn and dusk in Alaska.

trap-jaw

…and there’s yet another influence, one that  I thought I’d imagined for years – a toy set called Hamilton’s Invaders that was on the market for the blink-of-an-eye in 1964. It also used colors like chartreuse and turquoise found in my “Trap-jaw Palette” and while print advertisements were the only presence Hamilton Invaders had in the Last Frontier, what I saw was intriguing enough to have a permanent  aesthetic influence on me.

 

It All Works Out…

It’s been a good news/bad news type of situation the last couple of days. Good in that I’ve gone almost five months without an upper respiratory infection, bad in that I’ve finally come down with some kind of bug but good (?) in that it is some sort of stomach virus and I’m still able to breathe. I’m not getting as much done as I’d like but I’m grateful to be able to work.

My Star Pupil and his father helped me with installing a shelf in my Beautiful Saxon Princess’ part of the closet. In these types of situations BSP just laughs at me “at the five minute mark I hear you voice slip into that measured cadence and I know at that point you’re in teacher mode again. “

Dog King John & the Stolen Syrup Page 5

Latest installment – but lacking captions, logo etc. I don’t have a 11″X17″ printer/copier so I had to tile the image from multiple smaller prints – hence the  are also some obvious mismatched areas  I’m also trying to brainstorm a way to enhance the  aerial perspective as seen  out the window without the linework washing out completely in some places.

2019-01-01 dkj page 5 draft

2261 – Blade

I just found out about this! I think it is so incredibly cool to see someone take an idea of mine and run with it…but still stay faithful to my intent and design parameters.

Vintage Starships

The Blade class entered service in 2261 addressing concerns around the Signal intelligence (SIGINT) capabilities of the fleet, the name derived from the bladeship nickname that the design earned.

Bladeships are fully equipped with sensors and receivers for use in reconnaissance and surveillance, the huge blade housing massive arrays for monitoring communications and providing SIGINT.

Although the Bladeship design had some weaponry, the design as drafted was meant to fight running away (unusually it had two torpedo tubes firing aft but only one firing forward).

The designer of the bladeship, Commander Deitrick (unusually an operational intelligence office) based the design on his own experience of what was required in the role. After submitting the design to his superiors as part of a post mission debrief he was soon informed that a prototype would be built.

The first ship, USS Dagger, was built by Chandley…

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1975: A Better Christmas

I usually let a post sit for a couple of years before running it again but I’ve yet to come up with anything better on the subject of Christmas – so here goes….

David R. Deitrick, Designer

I have yet to utter my traditional Yuletide greeting (“I >bleep< hate Christmas!”) but I have found that to be the case as I have been  drifting through this emotional wasteland known as December as I have every year since 1966.  You’d think with my Arctic upbringing I’d at least like the weather, but I don’t. It just seems like the recurring irritants of life intensity during the closing of the year, things like:

  • Financial strain
  • Homesickness
  •  Disagreements with my Beautiful Saxon Princess over correct holiday traditions
  • …the fact that every disaster in my life has happened during the closing-of-the-year holidays

I’m not kidding. Disaster seeks out my Christmas like a starving eagle circles a bunny burrow – and we’re not talking about minor things like a stubbed toe or getting the Power Droid instead of Carbonite Han Solo in my stocking. We’re talking major life-changing events such as:

  • My…

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1969: Bah….humbug?

This week’s Saturday Morning/Evening re-run. I’m happy to say that the Christmas season is not quite as bleak in 2018 as it was five years ago when I first wrote this. Whether that change is due to a genuine change of heart or just fatigue I have no clue, all I know is that things are different now… different and better.

David R. Deitrick, Designer

Have I already mentioned that I hate Christmas?

My enmity to this time of year has little to do with the actual day but rather the personal history that surrounds it. Name a personal disaster or heartbreak in my life and odds are the event happened either in December or within 2 weeks north or south of that month. I’m not going to produce an itemized list but if you really want to know why I dread the twelfth month of the year, and why I am miserable to live with during that time send a private message. If I get enough a large enough response I’ll elaborate a bit and then you’ll know why my dear sweetheart deserves a six-figure cash bonus, the Victoria Cross and immediate translation for simply enduring my presence during the holidays, much less talk or interact with me in any way.

Christmas wasn’t always…

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1982: Better Than a Badge, Better Than a Medal

Saturday Morning Re-run for this week. As I’ve gotten older and older I’m less likely to talk to young soldiers because I feel like one of Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders conversing with a paratrooper from the 101st the night before the Normandy invasion. However I do think it’s interesting that our military still relies on the C-130 Hercules – the aircraft that figure so prominently in this post – 35+ years later…and it was considered “long in the tooth” even then in 1982.

David R. Deitrick, Designer

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Service members who fail to complete flight training rarely go on to spectacular careers – at least that was the common wisdom I picked up prior to being assigned to Officer Rotary Wing Aviators Course 44-79 in August of 1979. That “common wisdom” came back to haunt me when I received a medical disqualification the following April. I was passing all the academic courses and could hold my own in the cockpit, but had developed a vision problem during training that could possibly mean trouble during flight during darkness or instrument conditions. I was left hanging for three months before getting a final notice and while I made all sorts of jokes about seeing-eye dogs in the cockpit there was nothing to laugh about when I got the official word that I was not going to be spending a career flying helicopters.

I was angry. I was sad. I was…

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The Analoggers Strike Again!

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This week’s Saturday Morning Re-run: I found this post the other day while doing prep work for my “Cheap Tricks” book project and thought it was notable/repostable in that I made it exactly forty years ago during the Christmas break of my last year of undergraduate work. Staying immersed in work was a good way of dealing with the tension of the very imminent arrival of our first child Conrad – who started his run-in to the natal drop zone during the 31 December 1978 episode of Battlestar Galactica.

David R. Deitrick, Designer

The Analoggers Strike Again!

Well, not recently. This was done for my senior portfolio when I graduated from BYU in 1979.My three years there were not the happiest time in my academic career and it seemed like I was always “leading with my chin”. Since I was also enrolled in ROTC and due to go on active duty it shouldn’t have made that much of a difference…but it did.

During my last semester I really went all out to put together a great portfolio and this TV Guide mock-up was the centerpiece. I ended up redoing every illustration in my book that last semester. My only regret is this is the best copy I have, which is sad because this and “Solo Kill” won me awards in the student art show that year.

This was all done with cameras, copiers and hand-skills. For some reason I kept the clear acetate overlay and 13 years…

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Good Knight, Felix Knight

Re-run Saturday is rolling around twelve hours early this week. I’ve been comparatively healthy as of late but I’m starting to wheeze/sniffle and that has me a little worried. I battled bronchitis six times last year, with the last bout pegging the needle on the Scare-o-meter so I am going to take things easy for a bit. I will try to keep writing but just to be sure….

David R. Deitrick, Designer

This is a hard one to write. We all want to be the good guy and it is hard to admit to having been cruel. At least for me it is.

Felix Knight was an army buddy of mine back in the early 1980s. To be totally accurate he was more of a church/Scouting/army buddy of mine; we were both serving at the same base but saw each other more at church and Scout meetings that we ever did while in uniform. I don’t think that I ever saw him without a big smile on his face, but that big smile hid a lot of pain.

A decade earlier he had been an Army aviator serving in Viet-Nam, flying the OH-6 scout helicopter (a.k.a. “loach”). As was the case with most Hughes Aircraft products the OH-6 was extremely survivable; in the case of a crash the rotor blades would detach…

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