Sketch Book Figure 20JUL2018

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As I’ve written elsewhere female figures were not my strong suit in the early years and it wasn’t until I reached my forties that I was able to consistently draw women that didn’t look like linebackers in drag. Part of the progression was just “time in” – as classic animator Church Jones put it: “Every one of us had ten thousand drawings inside and the only way to get rid of them is to draw them out.”

There were two other important factors involved, the first being my Beautiful Saxon Princess. Not only has she served as an inspiring subject to draw over the years, she is an incredibly talented portrait in her own right and  double-checks every face I put to paper or wax.

The third factor? There are more ways available now to make women look better. Basic beauty has always been part of the human race but as time and technology progress women are presented in ever-improving ways. The massive explosion in information has given us  cosmetics with a more natural feel, clothes that are better tailored, and cameras that do a better job of capturing images.

Is all the progress beneficial? I’m not so sure – I’ve seen some pretty scary Photoshop treatments but at the same time you have to wonder what Sarah Bernhardt or Rita Hayworth would look like in a contemporary photo shoot.

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Sketch Cards for Dog King John

2018-06-03 GrandKid Cards JUN 2018

As I’ve written before I take great delight in my role as “papa” (AKA grandfather,  abuelo, old geezer) and even though six out of my seven grandchildren live far away I work hard to keep in contact with them. One of the ways I do that is by regularly sending drawings to them as postcards, starting out with one a month to my sole grandson and eventually expanding to a half-dozen every two or three months.

With these particular sketches  have fun and let my imagination run wild  – for example for my granddaughter Hazel I went through a six month run using yetis as a theme. The Yeti is/was Hazel’s own personal boogey-man and over the span of that half-year I worked to change the yeti’s image from something scary to a comedic figure.

Lately I’ve been using the cards as a design forum for my book project Dog King John and The Stolen Syrup. I want to keep the details consistent so I’m using these drawings to work out details before working on the actual book art .

…some of the cards are just cards though. The younger grandkids don’t really understand the book-thing – for them I come up with something quasi-educational like the “fourteen-flounder” card above

Working Drawings for Cut-Paper Sculpt

PhanGirldiagramEnjoying a motion picture at age 9  entailed a lot more than just sitting in the theater – as  soon as I got home I’d want to “play” the movie and  act out scenes as a way of prolonging the excitement. Reading my Legion of Superheroes books has punched some of the same buttons a movie does  but at 65 jumping off the deck while clad in Spandex just isn’t going to happen. At this stage of my life maintaining a link with the excitement entails some sort of creative work and this time around it will mean a cut-paper sculpt.

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In addition to the actual construction of the figures themselves I use a lot of paper in preparatory work. I carefully draw each figure/component , then make a dozen copies of each drawing. Then I cut each drawing into pieces I will then use as  templates in  making individual parts…and those parts will then be  assembled into major figures.  The  drawings you see here  depict  Phantom Girl, Bouncing Boy and Ultra Boy;   I may be adding another figure (Shrinking Violet) to the composition later on if the design can accommodate her. 

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1961: The Sandman

ReRun Saturday + 1. What I didn’t mention in this post was that 100 year old home didn’t last another twenty years. An extended family member had it leveled sometime in the Eighties and put a manufactured home on the lot. Logically I understood the move – the place needed constant repair and was hard to heat/cool but it still broke my heart when I heard the news. It felt like losing a grandparent.

David R. Deitrick, Designer

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The Sandman is a member of what I call second-string mythical characters.  Not prominent enough to rate the massive Disneyfication that would weld him into a universal image, the Sandman has been used in both print and broadcast media for a wide-range of roles ranging from benign wizard to superhero to evil demonic menace. You’re welcome to take your pick of any of these incarnations but personally I know him to be a kindly short little man dressed in mid-19th century British garb.

I know that because I actually saw him in 1961.

Despite the lack of any Romany blood (that I know of) my family and I were gypsies when I was a kid. Using education alone as a measuring stick it was obvious that we never stayed in one place for long; by the time I got to seventh grade I had been a student in seven…

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Amazon Review: Star Trek/Legion of Super-heroes Cross-over Book

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Despite their common use of  visual communication comic books and television shows are not always a good mix. While it is true comic adaptations can work well enough, the product of mixed genres can quickly become as corny and contrived  as the classic 70’s SNL skit What If : “What if the pioneers crossing the plains had to fight dinosaurs but the Man from U.N.C.L.E. went back through time to help them out”?

Luckily the DC/IDW Star Trek /Legion of Super-Heroes cross-over book avoids that trap. Jeffrey and Philip Moy have succeeded admirably in blending the  intense  color and dramatic styling of a superhero book with the late 1960’s visual splash of the original Star Trek series.  More importantly Chris Roberson’s plotting and dialog fits neatly into either books’ universe and he includes just enough fan-favorite Easter Eggs  from both properties to treat  the reader without being patronizing.

…and I will die a happy man after seeing Brainiac 5 and Mr. Spock quibble.

All in all it was a very readable book. I’d planned on stretching it by reading just once chapter at a time, but I had so much fun I got through it all in one night and was left wishing there were at least four more volumes in a series after this one.

The Star Trek/LSH book makes a pretty nifty addition to any  graphic novel library and I highly recommend it. If pressed to make a complaint it would be that I didn’t get to work on the project myself (I painted the dealer-incentive covers for IDW’s Wrath of Khan adaptation) As both a Trek and Legion fan I would have settled for $67 and an old hockey trophy for a chance at working on some as cool as this book.

The Archie Legion

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I started reading comics at age eleven and have continued reading since that time – but I don’t necessarily read everything. When I find a good combination of story and art  I’ll read a book until the situation changes so when the industry made the big “gritty” change in 1985 I came close to leaving the genre behind.

The Legion of Super-heroes is a two-time favorite. It was one of the first titles I regularly collected and I collected the spin-off Legionnaires in the mid-90s when Chris Sprouse was handling the art. Some fans dismiss that 1994-96 run as lightweight,  referring to it as “The Archie Legion” but I am quite vocal  about liking it.

…and after a late-night text-duel on the matter with my good friend Mark Angell I came up with today’s sketch.

Work in Progress: Un-named “Long-Skinny”

PrelimPutAWrenchOnItI start out most projects with a very distinct vision of the end product. Part of that stems from years doing work under contract…but I am also very strong-willed. There are times when I am not so rigid – marbleizing paper appeals to me not just as a means to an end but for the process itself. I’m creating but I have very little control over what’s going on.

…then there’s the middle-of-the-road project where I’m working in disciplined manner but not locked into a specific composition or message. I call these my “Jung” paintings where I just start drawing, then sit back, look at the panel and try to tap into my subconscious/unconscious mind. Therapy through painting.

This is one of those therapeutic paintings in progress. I don’t have a title yet and My Beautiful Saxon Princess will be working on it with me – I’m a little shaky with a brush right now. While some of the elements are familiar to the work I have done in the past the combinations have no strong relationship in my mind – at least for now.

…and yes, he is whittling a wrench out of a piece of wood.

Time (Again) For A Change

Some artists grumble about cropping work for these mastheads but I kind of like the format. My Beautiful Saxon Princess and I did field-of-vision  research in the late 1980’s  and found out that this lengthy horizontal format is closest to how humans take in their visual environment  – which leads me to speculate on whether that is due to humans moving as pack animals or a result of the same.

Consequently I went through a “long-skinny” phase in the early 1990s so in addition to what I previously posted there are two more “long-skinnies” in existence, but I am not sure if I can get useable imagery . In the thirty years since I first started painting in that  format we’ve moved five times while simultaneously going through more computers/hard drives that I care to remember – long story short: there’s   a lot of work I just don’t have access to.

There’s also the impact of technological change : from 1970 to 2010 I recorded my work on 35mm slides but eventually I had to concede defeat and shift to digital media. Unfortunately there aren’t too many service bureaus left that can work mountains of 35mm slides I have stacked all around my studio.h

Nocturne Revisited

(I have a love/hate relationship with this newest lap-top AND Windows 10. Among other things I can’t get images to size properly so you’re seeing them far larger than desired. You’re seeing “warts & all” of rough sketches and sculpts. The drawings are all 5″X8″ (13cmX21cm) and the figure is about 6″ (15cm) tall)

Despite the “speculative” nature of the art I create, fantasy and science fiction make up a small percentage of the books I read. Truth be told, I am a voracious reader consumer of history to the point that my Beautiful Saxon Princess laughingly refers to my interchange with Amazon as my “Osprey Book of the Day Club”. However in between all the aviation, militaria and steampunk, you can often find graphic novels,  and as I read my graphic novels I can often become a fan of a particular character… and like all fans a good part of my leisure time can be taken up with visualizing those favorite characters I’ve been reading about.

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The Marvel character Nocturne is one such character. Daughter of the Nightcrawler and Scarlett Witch from a parallel universe, she first showed up in the pages of Exiles, a sort of combined Quantum Leap / Sliders / What If book Marvel published around the turn of the new millennium. She went from there to the 00’s version of Excalibur but I’m not sure what book she is part of now.

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…other than my sketchbook. She shows up quite regularly when ever I am “doodling” ( yes, professional artists still doodle) and I’ve also made a sculpt-sketch of her – a quick model made of plumber’s putty, resin and Bondo®.

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In answer to your question: YES  she has a tail in some of these images. I don’t know if that issue has been resolved. I’ve never read a definite “no”, but I have read a comment that her tail is retractable, which would seem to be very uncomfortable…