Northway Mall Office “Plug”

NorthwayMallChugach

This illustration may have been the first assignment I received from the Anchorage advertising firm Murray, Bradley and Rocky. After I ran the ARCO illustration on the 22nd I got to thinking, which got me to rooting around what tear-sheets and records I still have from that time – and this is what I came up with. I know that I did it in late 1980 but so much was going at the time I can’t be sure which one happened first

…and my records are so spotty. For years I kept meticulous records, hauling at least two (and sometimes more) full file cabinets everywhere we went but after thirty-nine years and seven moves I’ve lost a lot of stuff. It’s the kind of illustration you’d see now only in a specialty publication or used to establish a nostalgic theme and would now be done in Photoshop or purchased from one of the numerous photo houses that flood the Internet.

It’s also of a time before internet commerce lead to the proliferation of ‘dead malls”. While Northway Mall was headed in that direction long before the rise of the Internet, when this advertisement first ran it was the one nicest shopping centers in Anchorage, anchored at each end and the middle with major retailers like Safeway and Pay-n-Save.

…though we were more interested in the Waldenbooks, gaming arcade and Art’s Video Mart stores where a good portion of my lieutenant’s pay was squandered on the 1st and 15th of every month….

1981: Alaska Cable Television Association Brochure Cover

ACTVBrochure 1982

In late 1974 vocalist Mac Davis did a cover of the Kevin Johnson tune “Rock and Roll I Gave You All the Best Years of My Life” . It was a catchy but bittersweet tune about unrequited love, not for a person but for a music genre and career field. I’ve always felt the message to be valid in my own creative career  as I was drawn to fannish subjects and clients but rarely got the recognition or success I could get in other fields.

This brochure cover is a case in point: I produced it at about the same time as I was painting a cover for a role-playing game company, but while this piece earned me a sizeable chunk of cash and a BONNIE (Best of the North//ADDY award) the cover paid a much smaller chunk and was barely acknowledged.

1980: ARCO Program Book Illustration

ARCO1980

My first freelance assignment after getting transferred to FT Richardson in 1980.

Actually I need to explain something: I started doing freelance work for role-playing game companies while I was still in school – mostly spot illustrations but also some micro-game covers. This was my first non-fannish assignment and was contracted through Murray, Bradley and Rocky, an Anchorage advertising agency that I think is still doing business albeit under a different name.

I did a LOT of advertising work in Anchorage and even won a “Bonnie” ( Best of the North award like the Addy award in other cities)

Life, Liberty and The Pursuit of Rock & Roll

Life, Liberty and The Pursuit of Rock And Roll

People become illustrators when they develop an affinity for a certain type of art. When I first started teaching thirty years ago everyone wanted to illustrate movie marquee posters but by the dawn of the new millennium all my students wanted to work in the computer gaming field. Tattoo art was the big thing two years ago as I was winding up my academic career but for me the magic genre  was music…

…as in album covers.  When I first started out I jumped into the role-playing came market as a way to work into doing comics and book covers, but my Holy Grail was the 33 1/3 r.p.m. record album cover. Covers measured twelve inches by twelve inches and uniformly presented 144 square inches of the most dynamic art on the planet. Roger Dean, Phillip Travers , Kim Whitesides and Patrick Woodruffe were my favorites as was (unknown to me at the time) Phil Hartmann of SNL fame and I worked as hard as I could to break into that market and rub creative shoulders with those guys.

I was delighted when asked to create this cover in the fall of 1983 and hoped for many more such assignments but little did I know that before long the cassette, then the CD would conspire to eliminate this wonderful genre. I got a second similar assignment for an album entitled “Runaway Heart’ which was followed by a flock of forgettable kiddie records but by the middle of the Eighties the LP market was all but gone. I wanted to grouse about the situation but to be honest I was (still) delighted to have the small part of the market that I did.

Production notes: I don’t remember what happened to the original so it may be stashed in a box somewhere in the house or garage.  Airbrush, pen, colored pencil and gouache on hot-press watercolor board. It was rendered as a wrap-around illustration measuring 16″ X 32″ so this front cover would be 16″X16” square

Mayday Cover Art

Mayday

I produced this illustration in and around the kiddie Traveller box art, with both projects getting sent to press just prior to my deployment via C-130 for JRX BRIM FROST 1983. I was glad to have the work but more than a little stressed as I was responsible for both getting the battalion ready to go as well as the running the airfield control group for the entire exercise once we got to the area of operations.

I also wondered why GDW was opting for a second cover so soon after the first printing. Say what you want about style but the original cover art by Rodger MacGowan is definitely an iconic piece in the Traveller mythos.

I have no idea where the original art ended up but I do remember it as measuring about 18″X24″ and was rendered with airbrush, colored pencil, marker and marbilized enamel on cold-press illustration board.

Cathaphract

Cathaphract

…when is a cut-paper sculpture not a cut-paper sculpture?

 That’s a question I answered during the spring of 1989 while teaching an introductory illustration course at Kenai Peninsula College (KPC) in Soldotna, Alaska. One of the last assignments I had the class do illustrate an historical event using cut-paper sculpture. I had fully intended on working alongside the class members  and illustrating a cathaphract (armored horseman) from the Romano-British period  of the 5th century but got stalled on the concept and finished it off in my regular airbrush/paint/pencil illustration technique.

 This painting is the result. It measures 9″X12″ and was rendered on illustration board, I still wince a little when I see it – I had this great idea about using plastic window screen mesh for the chain mail but it would be another fifteen years before my cut-paper skills would be up to the task.